World Mosquito Day: Basics Explained

A British doctor Sir Ronald Ross, on August 20, 1897, made a groundbreaking discovery. found that female Anopheles mosquitoes transmit malaria between humans. The parasite was located in the mosquito’s stomach.

To commemorate this moment in history, World Mosquito Day (WMD) was founded. Each year, WMD presents us with an opportunity to raise awareness of the dangers posed by mosquito-borne diseases and the ongoing efforts to combat the world’s deadliest creature.

Today, more than 125 years later, mosquito-borne diseases kill more than one million people and infect up to 700 million each year – almost one in ten people.

Already in 2023, there have been more than three million dengue cases and over 1,500 dengue-related deaths globally. in order to honor the discovery made of the link between humans, malaria, and mosquitoes. This is something that has changed the health industry considerably, ensuring that humans can be protected.

Vector-borne diseases are human illnesses caused by parasites, viruses and bacteria that are transmitted by vectors; example like  dengue, malaria, chikungunya, yellow fever and Zika

                  Vectors are living organisms that can transmit infectious pathogens between humans, or from animals to humans. Many of these vectors are bloodsucking insects, which ingest disease-producing microorganisms during a blood meal from an infected host (human or animal) and later transmit it into a new host, after the pathogen has replicated.

VectorDisease causedType of pathogen
Mosquito AedesChikungunya
Dengue
Lymphatic filariasis
Rift Valley fever
Yellow Fever
Zika
Virus
Virus
Parasite
Virus
Virus
Virus
AnophelesLymphatic filariasis
Malaria
Parasite Parasite
CulexJapanese encephalitis
Lymphatic filariasis
West Nile fever
Virus
Parasite
Virus
Aquatic snailsSchistosomiasis (bilharziasis)Parasite
BlackfliesOnchocerciasis (river blindness)Parasite
FleasPlague (transmitted from rats to humans)
Tungiasis
Bacteria
Ectoparasite
LiceTyphus
Louse-borne relapsing fever
Bacteria Bacteria
SandfliesLeishmaniasis
Sandfly fever (phlebotomus fever)
Parasite Virus
TicksCrimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever Lyme disease
Relapsing fever (borreliosis) Rickettsial diseases (eg: spotted fever and Q fever)
Tick-borne encephalitis
Tularaemia
Virus
Bacteria
Bacteria Bacteria
Virus Bacteria
Triatome bugsChagas disease (American trypanosomiasis)Parasite
Tsetse fliesSleeping sickness (African trypanosomiasis)Parasite

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